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20131208
20131208
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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
created more minutes than. many new religions are created, but they don't survive after the death of the charismatic leader because there's no person to follow a period david miscarriage save scientology. they saved it from the mistakes hubbard made. 1993 -day-old billion dollars for at the time. at the time, we at $129 million. they've decided we have to get our tax exemption. saturday go about it? been launched 2400 lawsuit against the irs and individual agents. they hired private detectives to go around to conferences where they trail people and find out who's drinking too much, who was sleeping around to publish articles in the magazines about this and pass them the steps of 1111 constitution avenue, which is headquarters of the irs. they intimidated the irs. now whatever the merits of their case, those were the facts that surrounded their getting a tax exemption. it was -- you know, i just said they owed a billion dollars. the irs prime and $12 million did they forget the billion dollars. they gave them the authority to decide on their own which parts of the church are actual
by theologians and philosophers of religion. insofar as the present is the product of the past, any adequate historical accounts must be able to pay attention to antics lang all of these claims. the modern liberal institutions variously characteristic of all contemporary western states permit this ideological heterogeneity through the legal and political protection of individual citizens to believe and live as they please so long as they obey the established laws. so that is what needs to be accounted for. these institutions in the ideologicideologic al heterogeneity that they bring. the book's explanation of how the past became the present question says mark mentions many widely held assumptions. the reason is simple. typical narratives, common conceptions of change over time and ordinary historical methodologies cannot answer the book central question. they fail to do justice to the full range of moral and metaphysical commitment encompassed under the first-person plural, we. when it is used inclusively have all present-day europeans and the americans. who are we? we should not underestima
of religion which is something we support. i think the more information you get the more you find out there are -- [inaudible] myths out there about the aclu -- my book is about people not only terrorists not only about them but us. now peter was asking before about the impact of some of these surveillance provisions and so forth. i was talking about how it gives us less privacy under the fourth amendment. it's not just the fourth amendment. it's also, you know, you talk about freedom of religion. that's about the first amendment. and my concern is that we're losing a lot of first amendment rights in term of freedom of speech, association, and of religion. so the freedom of religion if the government went after muslim charities right after 9/11. there were a lot of charities shut don -- down or doing badly. even though there was no evidence doing anything wrong. this that harms the first amendment. a study publish a week ago -- they did a survey of their members, the journalists and writers members of it. and what they found was that one in six of the people they surveyed said they ce
thing than the religion of islam which is practiced by so many people in some way different ways more than a billion people in the world. but i think this misunderstanding of the nature of the threat of the ideology of islamism the human rights of muslim heritage themselves persist today. i would argue and see this at the moment in the press coverage of what is happening in countries like egypt. doing this kind of work on the front lines without international support, without international comprehension of the challenge that you face is an incredibly lon lonely endeav. i have seen this firsthand. as a lawyer told me back in december 2012, at a time when entire northern half of her country was under jihadists occupation, she said international solidarity is very helpful. when you live such a crisis alone, it is much more difficult to bear. what my book is really about is trying to break this wall of loneliness and silenced by connecting the people who are doing these struggles on the ground, the people around the world who stand for similar values of tolerance and equality and against
. >> it's a religion? >> no. it's false. >> true or false, masons were behind the american revolution? >> false. false. >> what about on the dollar bill the pyramid, that's masonic, right? >> everybody says -- in fact it's a common place in the ancient century. >> true, free mase sons laid the cornerstone of america well at least some of it's most iconic structures. what is freemasonry? >> simply put the oldest and largest fraternity. it's membership of who's who of world history. george washington, benjamin franklin, winston churchill, mozart, franklin radios vealed. henry ford, john wayne, even colonel sanders. if you want to be a mason you can petition a local lodge for membership. you'll need to demonstrate good characters and belief in some sort of supreme being. oh, in almost all lodges, it's men only. next you're up for a vote from grand master james sullivan. >> the lodge votes to accept you then you have the three degree, is that you go through. >> once you earn the third degree, yes, that's where the phrase comes from, you can join any number of masonic off shoot. he's a deg
. a new religion you get those who've left home to use that religion is an excuse for extremists. that would be a concern but that was clear evidence that there are bargains to be radicalized i'm forced to join direct causation will be on a full report christmas who then can become extremists as well evidence for the prison open sissy name stays put the as are necessary he said not finding pellets as having shelved and then they say its length and gangs have grey and in how and influence in jail to leave the country and the prison open to safety a sniff confronts that they target vulnerable new arrivals that can touch it and that the islamists that already being forced into more extremist views. he speaks some christmas in the italian law enjoyed the benefits. all done it again if i'm a self all heart on that had just the same as the pa for a kind of trip atonement for protection how dumb it because i'm cool with extremists who was ultimately released from behind these moles back into society. it's been three weeks now since the air crash in the russian city of cuz on that killed
. maybe red. nothing about christmas these days is such a secular religion to people. it's not. there's nothing about the birth of jesus at this holiday party and any kid that's telling his friend about the three wise men, has no friends. it's not his friends it's himself. >> i got nothing to say about this. this is racial. >> i was going to ask you if this is political correctness gone amuck. i was thinking should it be run amuck, so i decided not to ask it. >> we live in a country where the christmas colors are as dan dangerous as the ones gang bangers use. what's my point? >> the font is too small. >> i blame the teachers that go along with this. they don't want to hurt anybody's feelings. >> they whisper it on national tv. nobody is going to see this. >> you know what i ean? they're afraid of being sued by the aclu. call their bluff. i got on plane. he's reading out of book. ban his hat. >> why does that make you uncomfortable? >> because, i don't know. did they hurt you? he's praying away meaning he knows something about the plane that i don't. >> where did we end up with jews in
. >> sarah, our resident religion expert at the table, you have a religious unpopular -- >> i have a related unpopular opinion to sahil's, which is that politicians should stop talking about religion, god and the bible. >> so -- >> people would be less -- public polly would icy would be less on -- >> why is in no safe zone in politics? >> 20% of the american public is not affiliated with a particular religion. there is a smaller segment of those who are atheist than agnostic. still, as he points out, it is kind of amazing that given the rise in the number of american atheists and nonbelievers there is not a single one in the u.s. congress and that it would be poison to run and openly declare you're an atheist. look at mark pryor's ad where he talked about the bible and he doesn't have all the answers, only god has all the answers. it is, like, well, if you don't have answers, why are you running for office? >> but flip it around, though. there has to be some -- to an elected official who sincerely believes in higher power, practices their faith, there has to be some civic value in that too,
's no great religion that doesn't speak to this. at root, every great religion has some equivalent of the golden rule, some equivalent of the idea that i am my brother's keeper and my sister's keeper. some notion that even as we each take individual responsibility for acting in a responsible and righteous way, part of our obligation is to the larger world. and to future generations. you know, i think pope francis is showing himself to be just an extraordinarily thoughtful and soulful messenger of peace and justice. i haven't had a chance to meet him yet. but everything that i've read, everything that i've seen from him indicates the degree to which he is trying to remind us of those core obligations. and as i said in my speech yesterday, we live in a economy that is the greatest generator of wealth in history. we're risk takers, we're entrepreneurs, and we're rugged individuals. that's part of what makes us great. that's why we continue to be a magnet for strivers from all around the world. they think i'm not going to be held back by conventions and traditions. i'm going to go out
that jews can go to the holiest place in the jewish religion. jews are not allowed to go to the temple mount because the mosque is there. that is outrageous. places of worship should be open to everybody who wants to worship. but israel does not allow jews to go out of respect for the muslims. tell me another country that behaves like that. >> your argument is more with the government of israel than with the palestinians? >> not true. >> it is true. you are prepared if palestinians would accept the deal president clinton offers. the government of israel would not accept the offer president clinton offered. when he offered it, yasir arafat turned it down. some say that later he regretted that. >> you know who told him not to accept it? even though he changed his mind since? the head of the palestinians told arafat not to accept it. >> you are arguing for a deal -- >> do you know that for a fact? >> we can find out by asking, would they accept the 67 deal offered by president clinton at camp david? why don't we do that? >> for the israelis, we will do that at the forum with pleasure. for the i
to the news that religion is an excuse for extremists. i'm dealt with to put this in part that was clear evidence that there are arguments to be radicalized. i'm forced to join direct causation all beyond a folder for christmas who then can become extremists as well. evidence for the prison open sissy name stays put the as are necessary he said not finding pellets as having shelved and then they say its length and gangs have grey and in power and influence in jail to leave the country and the prison open the safe nation is concerned that they target vulnerable new arrivals that can touch it and that the islamists that is already being forced into more extremist views. he speaks some business in a tone that you are going to the bathroom. all summer to get more fiber itself. all art doll that had just the same as the pa for a kind of trip. atonement for protection. how dumb it because i'm cool with extremists who was ultimately released from behind these moles back into society. they expect the store is one of them one must not be enough artist of the north korean jail calm the seas had to
environmentalism as a religion they have a high priest the nobel laureate laureate, of the oscar winner of court you have to accept what he says with a knife faith and without logic. >> butsome blindness to the fact you mention al gore i was surprised to see build the monster homes while preaching? >> the hypocrisy is monumental the 19,000 square foot mansion in tennessee, a group could get a hold of his utilities was 20 times of the average american also mention at mont to cboe near zero pres house. john: are any of those environmental activist not hypocrites? to some live the life? >> ed begley, jr., daell hill and that, they actually live a lifestyle consistent with what they preach but that is rare. the vast majority of celebrities take opulence to the highest level. john: ptt said turn your lights out but also he has big houses. reason to be combined his video. >> i pledge to turn the lights off i would leave them on but i will turn them off. >> is the unaware of the hypocrisy? >> i just think he goes out on tour and has a carbon footprint of a third-world nation with the idea that that wi
on mandela's message of peace which transcended re and religion while his lead a service of the brightest in the methodist church in johannesburg. monday marks the formal start of the week long state funeral for the man who helped and apartheid. ike. gathering on a hillside overlooking johannesburg on sunday morning. the south africans awoke to a day of prayer sunday marks the official start of the week the mourning period for nelson mandela. i had plenty of activity as of the time many stories to his collective eyes natural holiday to me. do we allow police to you. i see on tv crowds across the country continue to pay their respects. some are even hoping to pass on mandela's message to those who didn't know him. plus he didn't see teach us to attend. he never really knew him. um what kind of a different county. and to be on someone. the sun stayed my little surreal to appeal to me and asked so on. it's a sad day that the city to the south african president jacob tomorrow and monday of the second wife winnie mandela attended the service of the riots methodist church to mark the day over i
. and so it's so important. i think of abraham, joshua, the great rabbi. he said you can sum up religion in one word, remember. and so we remember these stories. >> speaking of remembering, when is your christmas eve service. >> christmas eve of course at 7 o'clock. fairfield community united methodist church. you've been there quite a number of times. in fact you brought my mother on easter. i thought that was significant. >> seven o'clock on christmas eve. good time to be there. >> sunday mornings at 10:30. >> well, it's an easy drive up from the bay area. >> right. >> go there once -- one of the best preachers, one of the best preaches there is. thanks for having me on, ron. >> thank you. >> merry christmas to you. >> merry christmas to all of you. thank you for joining us. [son] all right,she has no idea. [man] no one told her,right? [son]hi! [mom screams] >>> and welcome to bay sunday, everybody. i'm your host. pardon the voice. we begin with our pitch. if you've got a show idea, we'd love to hear from you. go to our website, scroll down to bay sunday and hopefully we can all hook u
and beating us with their bottoms here is another religion is a postponement is a new party in the stomach and on saturday. more violence that began as a peaceful demonstration was broken up by force. her breasts the protester and hands but demonstrators continued to get taken away in the spark in some ways that the case of david versus goliath a tiny romanian village fighting to get an energy giant chevron off limits lands. but despite the arrests despite the protests and despite the clash as the chevron trucks are already here. no work look sets to one reporting in to ingest romania rt and the sea captain of. and our mental campaign and in minutes as governments are using false promises to cover up the tooth technology. check it out got a fifty and one of the ottoman to the government can fall in south africa that was going to bring down i need to fill that idea and it cannot lift anything that affects you stay safe at home felt that this wedding bring down any cute though because we're in at a european markets that we don't think you can in effect fill cupcake that i think is going to h
islam a as a great religion while at the same time seeing no contradiction in denouncing, opposing and rallying the nation to fight the we accelerated branch of islam -- perverted branch of islam which attacked us so wantonly on nerve. i wrote at the time and i believe to this day that history will treat you like harry truman, recognizing the depths of your achievement and creating the very infrastructure that will carry us through this war on barbarism. we are already seeing in this today in a kind of backhanded tribute to you as those who so criticized you during those eight years, the very people who did criticize you in those eight years when they came to power, they adopted the very same tools that you bequeathed to them, and that you and your administration had created in a moment of national confusion and danger. just as truman did in his day, providing the infrastructure, the tools and the institutions that carried us through the cold war in those days and will carry us through this war. in this generation. and if i can just repeat what i said to you in private, but i'd lik
was a little boy that changed his life in terms of faith and religion. deeply religious, and yet he was completely devastated by this event. he felt like nothing. he felt like if he could be hunted down like an animal, if he could see his friend getting killed, just, like, he could not understand it, he could not compute it, but the last time i saw him, he was in a relationship. he had a job. the person he's with has several chirp, so he was a step dad, and he seemed, if not happy, in a better place than when i met him. you know, time heals, sometimes. people move on. >> to assume this happens in our places too, so have you found anything? >> you know, one thing that i found while reporting this book, there was so much i didn't know; right? it's, like, anything, you know? writing a book is like getting a ph.d. on something. one thing i found out is that practically not one state has not had a hate crime against latinos, lately, but also his story going -- we have a pretty -- it's in the book. there's a whole chapter on that. we have a pretty dismal history in terms of hate crimes. w
them an opportunity to intrude on religion, and what is to stoop them -- stop them from saying you have to cover abortion. that's why notre dame filed the lawsuit. >> are there students at notre dame that disagree with the lawsuit and think they ought to provide contraception? >> of course. of course. i've engaged other students and they're -- what they're saying is this is a matter of a woman's access to contraceptive coverage. one person engaged me and said contraception costs a lot of money. $200, and workers at notre dame don't make a lot of money so the university should cover it. but what we have to remember is that this isn't about a woman's access to contraception. this is about religious liberty, and notre dame maintaining its integrity. and not being compromised by the federal government. >> i think it's important to realize, when people say they're restricting access. they're not restricting access. they're determining who pays for it. >> exactly. >> i can go to a movie theater -- i have access to go, but i got to buy my own ticket. it's like if i want to see this movie in th
, it's more about that thanes the about some sort of traditional belief and religion. >> we can tell, we can see around you, people are mourning, but when you talk to them, what is the sense of loss? what are they mourning? >> reporter: they're of course mourning nelson mandela, but mandela was like a mirror, he reflected back to south africa, what they want to be, what this nation imagined itself to be. perhaps an idealistic vision, an complicated often -- very visionary leadership we saw in mandel l.a. you spoke about it a little bit earlier. he really played the long game, didn't he? he looked ahead, he planned, he was a man who really thought about being a symbol of rec reconciliati reconciliation. now compare that to president zuma whose leadership and whose government seems to lurch from crisis to crisis, there seems to be an overwhelming focus on scandals or the personal enrichment whether it's linked to president zuma or those close to him. according to many south africans there's a real current in this current government of the trappings of power, of using the state to furth
by the hundreds. each day we see the rainbow that is the new south africa. people of all religions, all colors, all united in their affection for this one man, nelson mandela. nelson mandela was not a particularly religious man. today in churches and houses of worship across south africa, prayers and songs for the man who had an abiding faith in the human spirit and in his nation, to move beyond apartheid. >> to keep his legacy going, we need to keep living what he's set out for us. >> he was a hero. he fought for us. he suffered for the whole world. >> reporter: the mood here remains more celebratory than somber. overnight, the family spokesman spoking to the media frp the first time, with mandela's grandson close by. >> in our hearts and souls, he will always be with us. >> reporter: today's national day of prayer kicks off a week-long celebration. next up, a memorial service on tuesday, taking place at the fnb stadium in johannesburg. mandela made his last public appearance at the 2010 world cup. it's confirmed, president obama and the first lady will be there, along with former president g
where they are from, no matter their race or religion, nelson mandela's name will be among them. >> nelson mandela did not pretend to be a saint and the coverage has taken note of some of his mistakes but and he was symbol, a courageous are moral leader, the coverage can barely convey. >> everyone prize themselves on scoring points for one side or another. it was nice to see a story for once where the "new york post," "new york times," mother jones everyone was in agreement that we lost a great man. that was refreshing. >> there's been a little bit of point scoring. "huffington post" put up how right let nelson mandela down. but there does seem to be an absence of cynicism and everybody feeling like we have witnessed the passing of a guy who spent 27 years in prison and came out to be a tremendous leader. >> can i just say, even on twitter, i think we're not used -- we forgot about the time when there was no snark and have a conversation and say he was a great person. it was interesting to see some of the old coverage dusted off, like this weekend interview with dick cheney he s
traditional belief in religion. >> we can see around you people are mourning, but when you talk to them, what is the sense of loss? what are they mourning? >> reporter: you know, they are, of course, mourning nelson mandela, but just remember mandela was like a mirror. he reflected back to south africa what they wanted to be, what this nation imagined itself to be. perhaps an idealistic vision. today 20 years later, this is a very complicated, often divided at times nation. now, what they also i think are mourning is that very vision of leadership we saw in mandela. you spoke about it a little earlier. he really played the long he? he looked ahead. he planned. he was a tactician, a pragmatist. he was a man who really thought about being a symbol of reconciliation. compare that with president zuma whose leadership and whose government seems to lurch from crisis to crisis. there seems to be an overwhelming focus on scandals over personal enrichment, whether it's president zuma or those close to him. they seem to have according to many south africans, there is a real focus of this current gover
races and religion say mandela created that had unity. at an interfaith service, south africans celebrated the respect that mandela provided them. >> celebrate. it's an important model for human society. >> it lions us to be. >> down the road at an indian rally, man dela was thanked on behalf of children. 20 years ago, perussia was a second-class citizen. apartheid didn't only segregate blacks. >> we were part of the deprived lot. >> her husband suffered the same. he remembers being humiliated just for eating dinner. >> we used to go down in the evening to find something to eat. we had to say to the guy. sorry, do you sell to us? he would say, no we don't but you guys can go around the corner and you are more than welcome to buy take-aways. >> their kids have no idea what their parents went through, which is just fine for them. >> tell me about these. >> perussia shows off achievements she wasn't allowed to dream. her kids graduated from integrated colleges. one is a doctor, the other training to be a teacher. >> it's an awesome feel to go have brought up children in the multi-r
, their religion, nelson mandela's name will be among them. >> he did not pretend to be 10 saint. coverage has taken note mistakes but he was such a courageous moral leader and a symbol the coverage can barely convey his legacy. what struck you most about the continuing coverage leading up to this? >> it was refreshing we live in an age where everyone prides himself on scoring points for one side or another and the media is increasingly partisan and polarized and it was nice to see a story where new york post and "new york times" and mother jones believed the world left one of the greatest men ever. >> this is legitimate debate about apartheid in the 80's but there is an absence of cynicism and snarking and everyone feeling like we have witnessed the passing of a guy who spent 27 years in prison and came out to be a tremendous leader. >> even on twitter, we are not used to us, we have forgotten when there was no snark and quote have a conversation and say we are sad, he was great person and it was refreshing to see that. not just the old coverage dusted off like the interview with dick cheney
in south africa today. millions of people, regardless of their race, color, or religion, unified in prayer, song, and remembrance in honor of nelson mandela. today's national day of prayer and reflection marks the beginning of a week-long program of mourning in his memory. let's go right now to nbc's michelle koh zin ski, who's in the middle of it all. michelle, a good evening your time. what are we seeing? >> reporter: hi, alex. right here this was a fence lined with some flowers outside the mandela property. now it has become several large hills full of flowers lined with people. you can imagine in churches around the world today mandela was mentioned. here today people were basically encouraged to do their own thing, to reflect on the melgszage of this champion of freedom. but in enormous numbers, people felt much better gathering together, includingmembers of mandela's family. it had the feeling of a sunday revival. here a few hundred gathered in a tent at mandela's offices, anything but quietly reflective, full of joy. >> we don't mourn quiet. we need to celebrate. we need to celebrat
think back to the 1990's, various european countries in particular of standing with historic co-religion, the idea that catholic portions of europe were standing with the co-ops and others, the serbs because of old religious orders. i think we have all learned from that, so that was not completely accurate depiction of the 1990's that we have to be extraordinarily careful. we are all skirting around the proper ways or the ways of describing a very complex situation. the u.s. does not want to be seen in the middle of a sectarian conflict. it gets to the whole issue of the sunni-shiite divide, the role of christians, the role of other religious groups in the area, because this is obviously something that is three much focus on in the context of the middle east peace process, and we have to be extraordinarily careful about how we deal with that. this is why we are not seeing the same kind of tone of the debate in the u.s. they do not want to have a particular constituency. there are other dimensions of the that we want to mention about the refugee process. we've seen a whole slew of her spe
the relationship between russia and israel has been transformed. how do you balance off the religion with iran in this very important position -- and russia's relationship with israel? it could be very interesting to watch this about how russia balance is off all of these competing demands. >> i will make one brief comment. i think russia and the u.s. have the same interest so far as iran and nuclear weapons are concerned. nuclear powers that have nuclear weapons do not want additional powers to have nuclear weapons. it is as basic as that. i think we share that interest. this is why i think we will work together to see whether we can transform the interim agreement into something more binding. that is a good accommodation to pursue. i am a little less rosy about the overall historical relationship between russia and iran. we elected iran against russia on more than one occasion, and iran and russia have had some real problems, territorial problems throughout the years. imperial problems. so i think those who ignore history or geo-strategy would be too sanguine about the long- range prospects
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)